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Urban air pollution and climate change: “The Decalogue: Allergy Safe Tree” for allergic and respiratory diseases care

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Molecular Allergy, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 129)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Urban air pollution and climate change: “The Decalogue: Allergy Safe Tree” for allergic and respiratory diseases care
Published in
Clinical and Molecular Allergy, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12948-018-0098-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vincenzo Patella, Giovanni Florio, Diomira Magliacane, Ada Giuliano, Maria Angiola Crivellaro, Daniela Di Bartolomeo, Arturo Genovese, Mario Palmieri, Amedeo Postiglione, Erminia Ridolo, Cristina Scaletti, Maria Teresa Ventura, Anna Zollo

Abstract

According to the World Health Organization, air pollution is closely associated with climate change and, in particular, with global warming. In addition to melting of ice and snow, rising sea level, and flooding of coastal areas, global warming is leading to a tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems. Moreover, the effects of air pollution on airway and lung diseases are well documented as reported by the World Allergy Organization. Scientific literature was searched for studies investigating the effect of the interaction between air pollution and climate change on allergic and respiratory diseases. Since 1990s, a multitude of articles and reviews have been published on this topic, with many studies confirming that the warming of our planet is caused by the "greenhouse effect" as a result of increased emission of "greenhouse" gases. Air pollution is also closely linked to global warming: the emission of hydrocarbon combustion products leads to increased concentrations of biological allergens such as pollens, generating a mixture of these particles called particulate matter (PM). The concept is that global warming is linked to the emission of hydrocarbon combustion products, since both carbon dioxide and heat increase pollen emission into the atmosphere, and all these particles make up PM10. However, the understanding of the mechanisms by which PM affects human health is still limited. Therefore, several studies are trying to determine the causes of global warming. There is also evidence that increased concentrations of air pollutants and pollens can activate inflammatory mediators in the airways. Our Task Force has prepared a Decalogue of rules addressing public administrators, which aims to limit the amount of allergenic pollen in the air without sacrificing public green areas. Several studies underscore the significant risks of global warming on human health due to increasing levels of air pollution. The impact of climate change on respiratory diseases appears well documented. The last decades have seen a rise in the concentrations of pollens and pollutants in the air. This rise parallels the increase in the number of people presenting with allergic symptoms (e.g., allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthma), who often require emergency medical care. Our hope is that scientists from different disciplines will work together with institutions, pharmaceutical companies and lay organizations to limit the adverse health effects of air pollution and global warming.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Student > Master 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 17 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,144,619
of 14,110,318 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#50
of 129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,881
of 270,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,110,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,754 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them