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A simple strategy for managing many recessive disorders in a dairy cattle breeding program

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics Selection Evolution, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
A simple strategy for managing many recessive disorders in a dairy cattle breeding program
Published in
Genetics Selection Evolution, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12711-015-0174-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

John B. Cole

Abstract

High-density single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes have recently been used to identify a number of novel recessive mutations that adversely affect fertility in dairy cattle, as well as to track other conditions such as red coat color and polled. Most current methods for mate allocation fail to consider this information, and it will become increasingly difficult to manage matings as the number of recessive mutations to be accounted for increases. A modified version of a mating strategy that constrains inbreeding based on genomics (the Pryce method) was developed that also accounts for the economic effects of Mendelian disorders on overall economic merit (modified Pryce method) and compared with random mating, truncation selection, and the Pryce scheme. Several scenarios were considered, including scenarios with six hypothetical recessive alleles and 12 recessive alleles that are currently segregating in the US Holstein population. The Pryce method and the modified Pryce method showed similar ability to reduce frequencies of recessive alleles, particularly for loci with frequencies greater than 0.30. The modified Pryce method outperformed the Pryce method for low-frequency alleles with small economic value. Cumulative genetic gain for the selection objective was slightly greater when using the Pryce method, but rates of inbreeding were similar across methods. The proposed method reduces allele frequencies faster than other methods, and also can be used to maintain or increase the frequency of desirable recessives. It can be easily implemented in software for mate allocation, and the code used in this study is freely available as a reference implementation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Finland 1 2%
Unknown 45 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 33%
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 63%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Mathematics 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,819,817
of 14,679,099 outputs
Outputs from Genetics Selection Evolution
#123
of 530 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,066
of 358,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics Selection Evolution
#6
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,679,099 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 530 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,890 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.