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Risk of MGUS in relatives of multiple myeloma cases by clinical and tumor characteristics

Overview of attention for article published in Leukemia (08876924), September 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

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33 tweeters
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9 Mendeley
Title
Risk of MGUS in relatives of multiple myeloma cases by clinical and tumor characteristics
Published in
Leukemia (08876924), September 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41375-018-0246-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alyssa I. Clay-Gilmour, Shaji Kumar, S. Vincent Rajkumar, Abdul Rishi, Robert A. Kyle, Jerry A. Katzmann, David L. Murray, Aaron D. Norman, Alexandra J. Greenberg, Dirk R Larson, Megan M. O’Byrne, Susan L. Slager, Celine M. Vachon

Abstract

We and others have shown increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) in first-degree relatives of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Whether familial risk of MGUS differs by the MM proband's age at onset, tumor or clinical characteristics is unknown. MM and smoldering MM (SMM) cases (N = 430) were recruited from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota between 2005-2015. First-degree relatives over age 40 provided serum samples for evaluation of MGUS (N = 1179). Age and sex specific rates of MGUS among first-degree relatives were compared to a population-based sample. Cytogenetic subtypes were classified by Fluorescence in situ hybridization. MGUS was detected in 75 first-degree relatives for an age- and sex- adjusted prevalence of 5.8% (95% CI: 4.5-7.2). Prevalence of MGUS in first-degree relatives was 2.4 fold (95% CI: 1.9-2.9) greater than expected rates. Familial risk did not differ by proband's age at diagnosis, gender, isotype, IgH translocation, or trisomy. This study confirms first-degree relatives of MM cases have a significantly higher risk of MGUS compared to the general population, regardless of age, gender, or tumor characteristics. In selected situations, such as multiple affected first-degree relatives, screening of first-degree relatives of MM cases could be considered for follow-up and prevention strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 44%
Student > Bachelor 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Unspecified 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 33%
Unspecified 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2019.
All research outputs
#804,404
of 13,347,801 outputs
Outputs from Leukemia (08876924)
#139
of 3,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,716
of 263,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Leukemia (08876924)
#7
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,347,801 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.