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Serum phosphate and social deprivation independently predict all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nephrology, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Serum phosphate and social deprivation independently predict all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease
Published in
BMC Nephrology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12882-015-0187-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marit D. Solbu, Peter C. Thomson, Sarah Macpherson, Mark D. Findlay, Kathryn K Stevens, Rajan K. Patel, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Alan G Jardine, Patrick B. Mark

Abstract

Hyperphosphataemia is linked to cardiovascular disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Outcome in CKD is also affected by socioeconomic status. The objective of this study was to assess the associations between serum phosphate, multiple deprivation and outcome in CKD patients. All adult patients currently not on renal replacement therapy (RRT), with first time attendance to the renal outpatient clinics in the Glasgow area between July 2010 and June 2014, were included in this prospective study. Area socioeconomic status was assessed as quintiles of the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD). Outcomes were all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and commencement of RRT. The cohort included 2950 patients with a median (interquartile range) age 67.6 (53.6-76.9) years. Median (interquartile range) eGFR was 38.1 (26.3-63.5) ml/min/1.73 m(2), mean (±standard deviation) phosphate was 1.13 (±0.24) mmol/L and 31.6 % belonged to the most deprived quintile (SIMD quintile I). During follow-up 375 patients died and 98 commenced RRT. Phosphate ≥1.50 mmol/L was associated with all-cause (hazard ratio (HR) 2.51; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.63-3.89) and cardiovascular (HR 5.05; 95 % CI 1.90-13.46) mortality when compared to phosphate 0.90-1.09 mmol/L in multivariable analyses. SIMD quintile I was independently associated with all-cause mortality. Phosphate did not weaken the association between deprivation index and mortality, and there was no interaction between phosphate and SIMD quintiles. Neither phosphate nor SIMD predicted commencement of RRT. Multiple deprivation and serum phosphate were strong, independent predictors of all-cause mortality in CKD and showed no interaction. Phosphate also predicted cardiovascular mortality. The results suggest that phosphate lowering should be pursued regardless of socioeconomic status.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 26%
Student > Master 5 16%
Researcher 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,432,587
of 11,274,188 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nephrology
#467
of 1,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,634
of 311,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nephrology
#20
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,274,188 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,105 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,361 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.