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Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, March 2011
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Title
Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, March 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2011.02463.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gilberto E. Flores, James H. Campbell, Julie D. Kirshtein, Jennifer Meneghin, Mircea Podar, Joshua I. Steinberg, Jeffrey S. Seewald, Margaret Kingston Tivey, Mary A. Voytek, Zamin K. Yang, Anna-Louise Reysenbach

Abstract

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Germany 3 2%
Russia 2 1%
Chile 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 131 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 22%
Student > Master 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 7%
Other 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 70 46%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 28 18%
Environmental Science 25 16%
Unspecified 10 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 6%
Other 10 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2011.
All research outputs
#10,943,144
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#2,430
of 2,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,894
of 232,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#109
of 140 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,046 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 140 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.