↓ Skip to main content

Trajectories of obesity by spousal diabetes status in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetic Medicine, September 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Trajectories of obesity by spousal diabetes status in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
Published in
Diabetic Medicine, September 2018
DOI 10.1111/dme.13811
Pubmed ID
Authors

O. Silverman-Retana, A. Hulman, R. K. Simmons, J. Nielsen, D. R. Witte

Abstract

To examine whether the development of obesity with age was different for individuals with and without a spouse with diabetes. We analysed data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing [n= 7123, median (interquartile range) age 59 (53-67) years, 51% men], which included four clinical examination waves between 1998 and 2012. The main exposure was having a spouse with diabetes. Outcomes of interest were BMI and waist circumference. We fitted quadratic age-related trajectories using mixed-effect models stratified by sex and adjusted for education, smoking and the corresponding interaction terms between age and spousal diabetes status. The baseline spousal diabetes prevalence was 4.4%. Men with a wife with diabetes experienced a steeper increase in BMI (1.6 kg/m2 ) between ages 50 to 65 years than men with a wife without diabetes (0.9 kg/m2 ). Women with a husband with diabetes had a similarly shaped BMI trajectory to women with a husband without diabetes, but their average BMI levels were higher between ages 55 and 65 years. Waist circumference trajectories showed a similar shape by spousal diabetes status for men and women, although individuals with a spouse with diabetes had higher waist circumference values throughout follow-up. We found a positive association between spousal diabetes status and obesity development, which differed by sex among middle-aged individuals. Evidence from couple-based interventions is needed to test whether the latter could improve the current individual-focused public health strategies for obesity prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 40%
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Professor 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 60%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,286,371
of 13,576,937 outputs
Outputs from Diabetic Medicine
#1,579
of 2,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,580
of 262,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetic Medicine
#26
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,576,937 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,504 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.