↓ Skip to main content

Activation of multiple chemotherapeutic prodrugs by the natural enzymolome of tumour-localised probiotic bacteria

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Controlled Release, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Activation of multiple chemotherapeutic prodrugs by the natural enzymolome of tumour-localised probiotic bacteria
Published in
Journal of Controlled Release, January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2015.11.030
Pubmed ID
Authors

Panos Lehouritis, Michael Stanton, Florence O. McCarthy, Matthieu Jeavons, Mark Tangney

Abstract

Some chemotherapeutic drugs (prodrugs) require activation by an enzyme for efficacy. We and others have demonstrated the ability of probiotic bacteria to grow specifically within solid tumours following systemic administration, and we hypothesised that the natural enzymatic activity of these tumour-localised bacteria may be suitable for activation of certain such chemotherapeutic drugs. Several wild-type probiotic bacteria; Escherichia coli Nissle, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus species, were screened against a panel of popular prodrugs. All strains were capable of activating at least one prodrug. E. coli Nissle 1917 was selected for further studies because of its ability to activate numerous prodrugs and its resistance to prodrug toxicity. HPLC data confirmed biochemical transformation of prodrugs to their toxic counterparts. Further analysis demonstrated that different enzymes can complement prodrug activation, while simultaneous activation of multiple prodrugs (CB1954, 5-FC, AQ4N and Fludarabine phosphate) by E. coli was confirmed, resulting in significant efficacy improvement. Experiments in mice harbouring murine tumours validated in vitro findings, with significant reduction in tumour growth and increase in survival of mice treated with probiotic bacteria and a combination of prodrugs. These findings demonstrate the ability of probiotic bacteria, without the requirement for genetic modification, to enable high-level activation of multiple prodrugs specifically at the site of action.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 49 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Chemistry 6 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2015.
All research outputs
#10,886,588
of 12,283,603 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Controlled Release
#5,167
of 6,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#263,083
of 323,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Controlled Release
#162
of 212 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,283,603 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,082 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,912 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 212 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.