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Sexual and reproductive healthcare for women asylum seekers in Switzerland: a multi-method evaluation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Sexual and reproductive healthcare for women asylum seekers in Switzerland: a multi-method evaluation
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3502-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eva Cignacco, Friederike zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, Coline Sénac, Anja Hurni, Doris Wyssmüller, Jean Anthony Grand-Guillaume-Perrenoud, Anke Berger

Abstract

Forced migration significantly endangers health. Women face numerous health risks, including sexual violence, lack of contraception, sexually transmitted disease, and adverse perinatal outcomes. Therefore, sexual and reproductive healthcare is a significant aspect of women asylum seekers' health. Even when healthcare costs of asylum seekers are covered by the government, there may be strong barriers to healthcare access and specific needs may be addressed inadequately. The study's objectives were a) to assess the accommodation and healthcare services provided to women asylum seekers in standard and specialised health care, b) to assess the organisation of healthcare provision and how it addresses the sexual and reproductive healthcare needs of women asylum seekers. The study utilised a multi-method approach, comprising a less-dominant quantitative component and dominant qualitative component. The quantitative component assessed accommodation conditions for women in eight asylum centres using a survey. The qualitative component assessed healthcare provision on-site, using semi-structured interviews with health and social care professionals (n = 9). Asylum centres were selected to cover a wide range of characteristics. Interview analysis was guided by thematic analysis. The accommodation in the asylum centres provided gender-separate rooms and sanitary infrastructure. Two models of healthcare were identified, which differed in the services they provided and in their organisation: 1) a standard healthcare model characterised by a lack of coordination between healthcare providers, unavailability of essential services such as interpreters, and fragmented healthcare, and 2) a specialised healthcare model specifically tailored to the needs of asylum-seekers. Its organisation is characterised by a network of closely collaborating health professionals. It provided essential services not present in the standard model. We recommend the specialised healthcare model as a guideline for best practise. The standard, non-specialised healthcare model used in some regions in Switzerland does not fully meet the healthcare needs of women asylum seekers. Specialised healthcare services used in other regions, which include translation services as well as gender and culturally sensitive care, are better suited to address these needs. More widespread use of this model would contribute significantly toward protecting the sexual and reproductive integrity and health of women asylum seekers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Researcher 1 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 16 73%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Unknown 17 77%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2020.
All research outputs
#4,930,017
of 16,106,256 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,496
of 5,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,762
of 278,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,106,256 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,581 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,513 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.