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Autoimmune encephalitis in humans: how closely does it reflect multiple sclerosis ?

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
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Title
Autoimmune encephalitis in humans: how closely does it reflect multiple sclerosis ?
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40478-015-0260-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Romana Höftberger, Marianne Leisser, Jan Bauer, Hans Lassmann

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Immunological studies suggest that it is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease, although an MS-specific target antigen for autoimmunity has so far not been identified. Models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in part reproduce features of MS, but none of the models so far covers the entire spectrum of pathology and immunology. Autoimmune disease of the nervous system has occasionally been observed in humans after active sensitization with brain tissue or brain cells, giving rise to acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and in rare cases reflecting an inflammatory demyelinating condition similar to acute multiple sclerosis. In this study we analyzed in detail the immunopathology in archival autopsy tissue of a patient who died with an MS like disease after repeated exposure to subcutaneous injections of lyophilized brain cells. The pathology of this patient fulfilled all pathological diagnostic criteria of MS. Demyelination and tissue injury was associated with antibody (IgM) deposition at active lesion sites and complement activation. Major differences to classical EAE models were seen in the composition of inflammatory infiltrates, being dominated by B-cells, infiltration of IgM positive plasma cells, profound infiltration of the tissue by CD8(+) T-lymphocytes and a nearly complete absence of CD4(+) T-cells. Our study shows that auto-sensitization of humans with brain tissue can induce a disease, which closely reflects the pathology of MS, but that the mechanisms leading to demyelination and tissue injury differ from those, generally implicated in the pathophysiology of MS through studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 54 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Other 6 10%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 15 26%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 33%
Neuroscience 12 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2020.
All research outputs
#1,345,820
of 15,549,387 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#143
of 893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,648
of 366,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#3
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,549,387 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.