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The climate hazards infrared precipitation with stations—a new environmental record for monitoring extremes

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Data, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
4 policy sources
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
968 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1399 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The climate hazards infrared precipitation with stations—a new environmental record for monitoring extremes
Published in
Scientific Data, December 2015
DOI 10.1038/sdata.2015.66
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris Funk, Pete Peterson, Martin Landsfeld, Diego Pedreros, James Verdin, Shraddhanand Shukla, Gregory Husak, James Rowland, Laura Harrison, Andrew Hoell, Joel Michaelsen

Abstract

The Climate Hazards group Infrared Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) dataset builds on previous approaches to 'smart' interpolation techniques and high resolution, long period of record precipitation estimates based on infrared Cold Cloud Duration (CCD) observations. The algorithm i) is built around a 0.05° climatology that incorporates satellite information to represent sparsely gauged locations, ii) incorporates daily, pentadal, and monthly 1981-present 0.05° CCD-based precipitation estimates, iii) blends station data to produce a preliminary information product with a latency of about 2 days and a final product with an average latency of about 3 weeks, and iv) uses a novel blending procedure incorporating the spatial correlation structure of CCD-estimates to assign interpolation weights. We present the CHIRPS algorithm, global and regional validation results, and show how CHIRPS can be used to quantify the hydrologic impacts of decreasing precipitation and rising air temperatures in the Greater Horn of Africa. Using the Variable Infiltration Capacity model, we show that CHIRPS can support effective hydrologic forecasts and trend analyses in southeastern Ethiopia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,399 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Argentina 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1385 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 294 21%
Student > Master 278 20%
Researcher 241 17%
Student > Bachelor 107 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 97 7%
Other 190 14%
Unknown 192 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 335 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 309 22%
Engineering 168 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 140 10%
Social Sciences 29 2%
Other 107 8%
Unknown 311 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 83. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2020.
All research outputs
#275,510
of 16,167,996 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Data
#89
of 1,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,613
of 369,400 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Data
#7
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,167,996 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,411 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,400 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.