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Metamizole versus placebo for panretinal photocoagulation pain control: a prospective double-masked randomized controlled study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Retina and Vitreous , November 2015
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Title
Metamizole versus placebo for panretinal photocoagulation pain control: a prospective double-masked randomized controlled study
Published in
International Journal of Retina and Vitreous , November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40942-015-0021-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rafael Barbosa de Araújo, Leandro Cabral Zacharias, Breno Marques de Azevedo, Beatrice Schmidt Giusti, Rony Carlos Pretti, Walter Y. Takahashi, Mário Luiz Ribeiro Monteiro

Abstract

Diabetic retinopathy is one of most common and threatening ocular diseases. Many of these patients need to be submitted to panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), experiencing a significant level of pain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of oral metamizole in reducing pain during PRP in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (VSNDR). Patients from a single center with PDR or VSNDR and indication of bilateral PRP were recruited for a double-masked, controlled, prospective study. The treated eyes were randomly assigned in two groups, and each patient had one eye assigned per group. Group A received 1000 mg of metamizole and group B received a placebo pill 40 min before the laser treatment. The groups were switched for the treatment of the fellow eye. Each patient scored the pain sensation immediately after each PRP section using Scott's visual analogue scale (VAS). The paired Student t test was used to measure the significance between the two groups VAS scores, with significance level adopted of p < 0.05. Twenty-one patients were recruited. The level of pain was significantly lower when submitted to PRP after oral metamizole treatment compared to placebo (p = 0.002). The mean pain scores for groups A and B were 4.72 ± 1.708 and 5.89 ± 1.967, respectively. The minimum/maximum scores within groups A and B were 1/8 and 1/10, respectively. The use of 1000 mg of metamizole 40 min before PRP significantly reduces the pain associated with the procedure in patients with PDR or VSNDR.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 31%
Student > Master 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 54%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,659,660
of 6,632,903 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Retina and Vitreous
#10
of 29 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,556
of 255,449 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Retina and Vitreous
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,632,903 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.6. This one scored the same or higher as 19 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,449 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.