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Phylogenomic analysis reveals splicing as a mechanism of parallel evolution of non-canonical SVAs in hominine primates

Overview of attention for article published in Mobile DNA, September 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

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7 tweeters

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Phylogenomic analysis reveals splicing as a mechanism of parallel evolution of non-canonical SVAs in hominine primates
Published in
Mobile DNA, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13100-018-0135-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annette Damert

Abstract

SVA (SINE-R-VNTR-Alu) elements are non-autonomous non-LTR (Long Terminal Repeat) retrotransposons. They are found in all hominoid primates but did not amplify to appreciable numbers in gibbons. Recently, phylogenetic networks of hominid (orangutan, gorilla, chimpanzee, human) SVA elements based on comparison of overall sequence identity have been reported. Here I present a detailed phylogeny of SVA_D elements in gorilla, chimpanzee and humans based on sorting of co-segregating substitutions. Complementary comparative genomics analysis revealed that the majority (1763 out of 1826-97%) of SVA_D elements in gorilla represent species-specific insertions - indicating very low activity of the subfamily before the gorilla/chimpanzee-human split. The origin of the human-specific subfamily SVA_F could be traced back to a source element in the hominine common ancestor. The major expanding lineage-specific subfamilies were found to differ between chimpanzee and humans. Precursors of the dominant chimpanzee SVA_D subfamily are present in humans; however, they did not expand to appreciable levels. The analysis also uncovered that one of the chimpanzee-specific subfamilies was formed by splicing of the STK40 first exon to the SVA Alu-like region. Many of the 94 subfamily members contain additional 5' transductions - among them exons of 8 different other genes. Striking similarities to the MAST2-containing human SVA_F1 suggest parallel evolution of non-canonical SVAs in chimpanzees and humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Unknown 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 27%
Computer Science 1 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2018.
All research outputs
#6,942,977
of 13,635,031 outputs
Outputs from Mobile DNA
#124
of 225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,619
of 265,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mobile DNA
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,635,031 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 225 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them