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Mass Drug Administration for Scabies Control in a Population with Endemic Disease

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
137 tweeters
facebook
31 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
158 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
218 Mendeley
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Title
Mass Drug Administration for Scabies Control in a Population with Endemic Disease
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, December 2015
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1500987
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucia Romani, Margot J. Whitfeld, Josefa Koroivueta, Mike Kama, Handan Wand, Lisi Tikoduadua, Meciusela Tuicakau, Aminiasi Koroi, Ross Andrews, John M. Kaldor, Andrew C. Steer

Abstract

Background Scabies is an underrecognized cause of illness in many developing countries. It is associated with impetigo, which can lead to serious systemic complications. We conducted a trial of mass drug administration for scabies control in Fiji. Methods We randomly assigned three island communities to one of three different interventions for scabies control: standard care involving the administration of permethrin to affected persons and their contacts (standard-care group), mass administration of permethrin (permethrin group), or mass administration of ivermectin (ivermectin group). The primary outcome was the change in the prevalence of scabies and of impetigo from baseline to 12 months. Results A total of 2051 participants were enrolled; 803 were in the standard-care group, 532 in the permethrin group, and 716 in the ivermectin group. From baseline to 12 months, the prevalence of scabies declined significantly in all groups, with the greatest reduction seen in the ivermectin group. The prevalence declined from 36.6% to 18.8% in the standard-care group (relative reduction in prevalence, 49%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 37 to 60), from 41.7% to 15.8% in the permethrin group (relative reduction, 62%; 95% CI, 49 to 75), and from 32.1% to 1.9% in the ivermectin group (relative reduction, 94%; 95% CI, 83 to 100). The prevalence of impetigo also declined in all groups, with the greatest reduction seen in the ivermectin group. The prevalence declined from 21.4% to 14.6% in the standard-care group (relative reduction, 32%; 95% CI, 14 to 50), from 24.6% to 11.4% in the permethrin group (relative reduction, 54%; 95% CI, 35 to 73), and from 24.6% to 8.0% in the ivermectin group (relative reduction, 67%; 95% CI, 52 to 83). Adverse events were mild and were reported more frequently in the ivermectin group than in the permethrin group (15.6% vs. 6.8%). Conclusions Mass drug administration, particularly the administration of ivermectin, was efficacious for the control of scabies and impetigo. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12613000474752 .).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 137 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 218 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 3 1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 211 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 32 15%
Student > Master 28 13%
Student > Bachelor 26 12%
Other 23 11%
Student > Postgraduate 18 8%
Other 52 24%
Unknown 39 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 101 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 3%
Other 22 10%
Unknown 53 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 195. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2021.
All research outputs
#128,071
of 19,593,175 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#2,989
of 29,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,813
of 389,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#72
of 374 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,593,175 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,275 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 103.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 374 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.