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Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in domestic dogs in Tabasco, southeastern Mexico

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, December 2015
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Title
Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in domestic dogs in Tabasco, southeastern Mexico
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, December 2015
DOI 10.1590/s1984-29612015077
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oswaldo Margarito Torres-Chablé, Ricardo Alfonso García-Herrera, Melchor Hernández-Hernández, Jorge Alonso Peralta-Torres, Nadia Florencia Ojeda-Robertos, Bradley John Blitvich, Carlos Marcial Baak-Baak, Julián Everardo García-Rejón, Carlos Ignacio Machain-Wiliams

Abstract

The overall goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites in dogs in the city of Villahermosa in Tabasco, Mexico. The study population consisted of 302 owned dogs that had limited access to public areas. A fecal sample was collected from each animal and examined for GI parasites by conventional macroscopic analysis and centrifugal flotation. Fecal samples from 80 (26.5%) dogs contained GI parasites. Of these, 58 (19.2%) were positive for helminths and 22 (7.3%) were positive for protozoan parasites. At least seven parasitic species were identified. The most common parasite was Ancylostoma caninum which was detected in 48 (15.9%) dogs. Other parasites detected on multiple occasions were Cystoisospora spp. (n = 19), Toxocara canis (n = 7) and Giardia spp. (n = 3). Three additional parasites, Dipylidium caninum, Trichuris vulpis and Uncinaria spp., were each detected in a single dog. No mixed parasitic infections were identified. In summary, we report a moderately high prevalence of GI parasites in owned dogs in Villahermosa, Tabasco. Several parasitic species identified in this study are recognized zoonotic pathogens which illustrates the important need to routinely monitor and treat dogs that live in close proximity to humans for parasitic infections.

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Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 3%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Unknown 33 94%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Unknown 33 94%