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A cross-sectional study of the effects of β-blocker therapy on the interpretation of the aldosterone/renin ratio

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hypertension, February 2016
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Title
A cross-sectional study of the effects of β-blocker therapy on the interpretation of the aldosterone/renin ratio
Published in
Journal of Hypertension, February 2016
DOI 10.1097/hjh.0000000000000775
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tomás P. Griffin, Gerard A. Browne, Deirdre Wall, Michael C. Dennedy, Paula M. O'Shea

Abstract

Aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR) is used as the primary screening tool for primary aldosteronism. Its interpretation is often challenging because of the interference of antihypertensive medication. β-blocker therapy suppresses renin production by inhibiting β-adrenergic receptors in the juxtaglomerular apparatus of the kidney and consequently aldosterone secretion (to a lesser extent). Therefore, β-blocker therapy has the potential to elevate the ARR. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not the effect of β-blocker therapy on the ARR could be predicted from the dosing regimen. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted. Participants were stratified into one of four groups (control/low/medium/high) based on the quantity of β-blocker prescribed. ARR was calculated from renin/aldosterone, measured using two assay systems. Eighty-nine volunteers were recruited to our study. In the control group, zero patients had a positive ARR using plasma renin activity (PRA)/direct renin concentration (DRC). In the low, medium, and high-dose β-blocker groups between 8-25% of patients demonstrated screen positive ARR results for primary aldosteronism using DRC and PRA. DRC was significantly lower in patients in the medium/high-dose groups and PRA significantly lower in the low/medium/high-dose groups compared with controls. ARR using DRC was significantly higher in the medium/high-dose groups and ARR using PRA was significantly higher in the low/medium/high-dose groups compared with controls. Our study suggests that β-blocker therapy is associated with an increased risk of positive ARR screens for primary aldosteronism irrespective of the dose of β-blocker prescribed, in patients in whom it is clinically reasonable to expect that primary aldosteronism may be present.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 4 24%
Other 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Unknown 7 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2015.
All research outputs
#9,878,935
of 12,366,438 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hypertension
#2,342
of 3,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,761
of 329,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hypertension
#62
of 91 outputs
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