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Household Income Relationship With Health Services Utilization and Healthcare Expenditures in People Aged 75 Years or Older in Japan: A Population-Based Study Using Medical and Long-term Care…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Epidemiology, October 2019
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Household Income Relationship With Health Services Utilization and Healthcare Expenditures in People Aged 75 Years or Older in Japan: A Population-Based Study Using Medical and Long-term Care Insurance Claims Data
Published in
Journal of Epidemiology, October 2019
DOI 10.2188/jea.je20180055
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shota Hamada, Hideto Takahashi, Nobuo Sakata, Boyoung Jeon, Takahiro Mori, Katsuya Iijima, Satoru Yoshie, Tatsuro Ishizaki, Nanako Tamiya

Abstract

This study aimed to determine whether there are disparities in healthcare services utilization according to household income among people aged 75 years or older in Japan. We used data on medical and long-term care (LTC) insurance claims and on LTC insurance premiums and needs levels for people aged 75 years or older in a suburban city. Data on people receiving public welfare were not available. Participants were categorized according to household income level using LTC insurance premiums data. The associations of low income with physician visit frequency, length of hospital stay (LOS), and medical and LTC expenditures were evaluated and adjusted for the five-year age group and LTC needs level. The study analyzed 12,852 men and 18,020 women, among which 13.3% and 41.5% were respectively categorized as low income. Participants with low income for both genders were more likely to be functionally dependent. In the adjusted analyses, lower income was associated with fewer physician visits (incidence rate ratio: 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.87-0.92) for men and 0.97 (0.95-0.99) for women), longer LOS (1.98 (1.54-2.56) and 1.42 (1.20-1.67)), and higher total expenditures (1.09 (1.01-1.18) and 1.09 (1.05-1.14)). This study suggests older people with lower income had fewer consultations with physicians but an increased use of inpatient services. The income categorization used in this study may be an appropriate proxy of socioeconomic status.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 46%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 23%
Social Sciences 3 23%
Unspecified 2 15%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2019.
All research outputs
#3,726,856
of 13,757,863 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Epidemiology
#128
of 475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,316
of 267,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Epidemiology
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,757,863 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 475 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,298 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.