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Disease association and inter-connectivity analysis of human brain specific co-expressed functional modules

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Research, December 2015
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3 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
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Title
Disease association and inter-connectivity analysis of human brain specific co-expressed functional modules
Published in
Biological Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40659-015-0061-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kimin Oh, Taeho Hwang, Kihoon Cha, Gwan-Su Yi

Abstract

In the recent studies, it is suggested that the analysis of transcriptomic change of functional modules instead of individual genes would be more effective for system-wide identification of cellular functions. This could also provide a new possibility for the better understanding of difference between human and chimpanzee. In this study, we analyzed to find molecular characteristics of human brain functions from the difference of transcriptome between human and chimpanzee's brain using the functional module-centric co-expression analysis. We performed analysis of brain disease association and systems-level connectivity of species-specific co-expressed functional modules. Throughout the analyses, we found human-specific functional modules and significant overlap between their genes in known brain disease genes, suggesting that human brain disorder could be mediated by the perturbation of modular activities emerged in human brain specialization. In addition, the human-specific modules having neurobiological functions exhibited higher networking than other functional modules. This finding suggests that the expression of neural functions are more connected than other functions, and the resulting high-order brain functions could be identified as a result of consolidated inter-modular gene activities. Our result also showed that the functional module based transcriptome analysis has a potential to expand molecular understanding of high-order complex functions like cognitive abilities and brain disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 17%
Unknown 5 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 33%
Other 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2016.
All research outputs
#4,003,363
of 7,722,452 outputs
Outputs from Biological Research
#94
of 206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,847
of 300,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Research
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,722,452 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 206 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,346 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.