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Evidence of a Christmas spirit network in the brain: functional MRI study

Overview of attention for article published in British Medical Journal, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
75 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
858 tweeters
facebook
79 Facebook pages
googleplus
16 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence of a Christmas spirit network in the brain: functional MRI study
Published in
British Medical Journal, December 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmj.h6266
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Hougaard, Ulrich Lindberg, Nanna Arngrim, Henrik B W Larsson, Jes Olesen, Faisal Mohammad Amin, Messoud Ashina, Bryan T Haddock

Abstract

 To detect and localise the Christmas spirit in the human brain.  Single blinded, cross cultural group study with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).  Functional imaging unit and department of clinical physiology, nuclear medicine and PET in Denmark.  10 healthy people from the Copenhagen area who routinely celebrate Christmas and 10 healthy people living in the same area who have no Christmas traditions.  Brain activation unique to the group with Christmas traditions during visual stimulation with images with a Christmas theme.  Functional brain scans optimised for detection of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response were performed while participants viewed a series of images with Christmas themes interleaved with neutral images having similar characteristics but containing nothing that symbolises Christmas. After scanning, participants answered a questionnaire about their Christmas traditions and the associations they have with Christmas. Brain activation maps from scanning were analysed for Christmas related activation in the "Christmas" and "non-Christmas" groups individually. Subsequently, differences between the two groups were calculated to determine Christmas specific brain activation.  Significant clusters of increased BOLD activation in the sensory motor cortex, the premotor and primary motor cortex, and the parietal lobule (inferior and superior) were found in scans of people who celebrate Christmas with positive associations compared with scans in a group having no Christmas traditions and neutral associations. These cerebral areas have been associated with spirituality, somatic senses, and recognition of facial emotion among many other functions.  There is a "Christmas spirit network" in the human brain comprising several cortical areas. This network had a significantly higher activation in a people who celebrate Christmas with positive associations as opposed to a people who have no Christmas traditions and neutral associations. Further research is necessary to understand this and other potential holiday circuits in the brain. Although merry and intriguing, these findings should be interpreted with caution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 858 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Denmark 2 2%
Chile 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 103 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 17%
Student > Master 18 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Other 8 7%
Other 26 24%
Unknown 12 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 31%
Neuroscience 14 13%
Psychology 11 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 17 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1333. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2020.
All research outputs
#2,644
of 14,574,973 outputs
Outputs from British Medical Journal
#84
of 46,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65
of 363,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Medical Journal
#3
of 886 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,973 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46,846 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,918 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 886 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.