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Prevalence of drug–herb and drug–supplement interactions in older adults: a cross-sectional survey

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
51 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence of drug–herb and drug–supplement interactions in older adults: a cross-sectional survey
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, September 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x699101
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taofikat B Agbabiaka, Neil H Spencer, Sabina Khanom, Claire Goodman

Abstract

Polypharmacy is common among older adults, with increasing numbers also using prescription drugs with herbal medicinal products (HMPs) and dietary supplements. There is no reliable evidence from the UK on concurrent use of HMPs and dietary supplements with prescription drugs in older adults. To establish prevalence of concurrent prescription drugs, HMPs, and dietary supplements among UK community-dwelling older adults and identify potential interactions. Cross-sectional survey of older adults registered at two general practices in South East England. A questionnaire asking about prescription medications, HMPs, and sociodemographic information was posted to 400 older adults aged ≥65 years, identified as taking ≥1 prescription drug. In total 155 questionnaires were returned (response rate = 38.8%) and the prevalence of concurrent HMPs and dietary supplements with prescriptions was 33.6%. Females were more likely than males to be concurrent users (43.4% versus 22.5%; P = 0.009). The number of HMPs and dietary supplements ranged from 1 to 8, (mean = 3, median = 1; standard deviation = 1.65). The majority of concurrent users (78.0%) used dietary supplements with prescription drugs. The most commonly used dietary supplements were cod liver oil, glucosamine, multivitamins, and vitamin D. Others (20.0%) used only HMPs with prescription drugs. Common HMPs were evening primrose oil, valerian, and Nytol Herbal® (a combination of hops, gentian, and passion flower). Sixteen participants (32.6%) were at risk of potential adverse drug interactions. GPs should routinely ask questions regarding herbal and supplement use, to identify and manage older adults at potential risk of adverse drug interactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 36%
Unspecified 4 29%
Student > Postgraduate 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 43%
Unspecified 6 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2018.
All research outputs
#157,178
of 13,631,817 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#65
of 2,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,285
of 265,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#5
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,631,817 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,963 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,423 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.