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Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, September 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.151167
Pubmed ID
Authors

Theodoor Visser, Jennifer Daily, Nora Hotte, Caitlin Dolkart, Jane Cunningham, Prashant Yadav

Abstract

Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 5 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Chemistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,419,720
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,798
of 3,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,834
of 329,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#17
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,725 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.