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The impact of restricted gestational weight gain by dietary intervention on fetal growth in women with gestational diabetes mellitus

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetologia, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of restricted gestational weight gain by dietary intervention on fetal growth in women with gestational diabetes mellitus
Published in
Diabetologia, September 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00125-018-4736-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lise L. Kurtzhals, Sidse K. Nørgaard, Anna L. Secher, Vibeke L. Nichum, Helle Ronneby, Ann Tabor, H. David McIntyre, Peter Damm, Elisabeth Reinhardt Mathiesen

Abstract

We aimed to investigate the impact of maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) during dietary treatment on fetal growth in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM). This was a retrospective cohort study of 382 women consecutively diagnosed with GDM before 34 weeks' gestation with live singleton births in our centre (Center for Pregnant Women with Diabetes, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark) between 2011 and 2017. The women were stratified into three groups according to restricted (53%), appropriate (16%) and excessive (31%) weekly GWG during dietary treatment (using the Institute of Medicine guidelines) to estimate compliance with an energy-restricted 'diabetes diet' (6000 kJ/day [1434 kcal/day], with approximately 50% of energy intake coming from carbohydrates with a low glycaemic index, and a carbohydrate intake of 175 g/day). Insulin therapy was initiated if necessary, according to local clinical guidelines. Glucose tolerance, HbA1c, weekly GWG before dietary treatment (difference between weight at GDM diagnosis and pre-pregnancy weight, divided by the number of weeks) and SD score for fetal abdominal circumference were comparable across the three groups at diagnosis of GDM at 276 ± 51 weeks (gestation time is given as weeksdays). The women were followed for 100 ± 51 weeks, during which 54% received supplementary insulin therapy and the average (mean) GWG during dietary treatment was 0 kg, 3 kg and 5 kg in the three groups, respectively. Excessive weekly GWG during dietary treatment, reflecting poor dietary adherence was associated with increasing HbA1c (p = 0.014) from diagnosis of GDM to late pregnancy and infants with a birthweight-SD score of 0.59 ± 1.6. In contrast, restricted weekly GWG during dietary treatment, reflecting strict dietary adherence, was associated with decreasing HbA1c (p = 0.001) from diagnosis of GDM to late pregnancy and infants with a birthweight-SD score of 0.15 ± 1.1, without increased prevalence of infants born small for gestational age. Excessive GWG during dietary treatment and late-pregnancy HbA1c were identified as potentially modifiable clinical predictors of infant birthweight-SD score (p = 0.02 for both variables) after correction for confounders. Restricted GWG during dietary treatment was associated with healthier fetal growth in women with GDM. GWG during dietary treatment and late-pregnancy HbA1c were identified as potentially modifiable clinical predictors of infant birthweight-SD score.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 14 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 18 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2018.
All research outputs
#3,175,823
of 14,056,733 outputs
Outputs from Diabetologia
#1,510
of 3,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,950
of 272,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetologia
#44
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,056,733 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,951 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,104 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.