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Carotenoid-based skin ornaments reflect foraging propensity in a seabird, Sula leucogaster

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, September 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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16 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Carotenoid-based skin ornaments reflect foraging propensity in a seabird, Sula leucogaster
Published in
Biology Letters, September 2018
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2018.0398
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan P. Michael, Roxana Torres, Andreanna J. Welch, Josh Adams, Mario Erandi Bonillas-Monge, Jonathan Felis, Laura Lopez-Marquez, Alejandro Martínez-Flores, Anne E. Wiley

Abstract

Carotenoid-based ornaments are common signalling features in animals. It has long been proposed that such ornaments communicate information about foraging abilities to potential mates. However, evidence linking foraging with ornamentation is largely missing from unmanipulated, free-ranging populations. To investigate this relationship, we studied a coastal population of brown booby (Sula leucogaster brewsteri), a seabird with a carotenoid-based gular skin ornament. δ13C values from both feathers and blood plasma were negatively correlated with male gular colour, indicating birds that consumed more pelagic prey in offshore locations had more ornamented skin than those that fed on nearshore, benthic prey. This relationship was supported by our GPS tracking results, which revealed longer, more offshore foraging trips among highly ornamented males. Our data show that brown booby ornaments are honest indicators of foraging propensity; a link consistent with the rarity hypothesis and potentially driven by the concentration of carotenoids found in phytoplankton versus benthic algae. Carotenoid-based ornaments may reflect foraging tendencies in animals such as coastal predators that use food webs with distinct carotenoid profiles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 31%
Researcher 3 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Professor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 50%
Environmental Science 4 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Unspecified 1 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,738,268
of 12,749,777 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#1,304
of 2,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,939
of 262,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#46
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,749,777 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,392 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.9. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.