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An antitumorigenic role for the IL-33 receptor, ST2L, in colon cancer

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Cancer, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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60 Dimensions

Readers on

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61 Mendeley
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Title
An antitumorigenic role for the IL-33 receptor, ST2L, in colon cancer
Published in
British Journal of Cancer, December 2015
DOI 10.1038/bjc.2015.433
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charlotte O'Donnell, Amr Mahmoud, Jonathan Keane, Carola Murphy, Declan White, Sinead Carey, Micheal O'Riordain, Michael W Bennett, Elizabeth Brint, Aileen Houston

Abstract

Despite the importance of inflammation in cancer, the role of the cytokine IL-33, and its receptor ST2, in colon cancer is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-33, and its receptor isoforms (ST2 and ST2L), in colon cancer. Serum levels of IL-33 and sST2 were determined with ELISA. ST2 and IL-33 expression was detected with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting and immunohistochemistry. ST2 expression in CT26 cells was stably suppressed using ST2-specific shRNA. Cytokine and chemokine gene expression was detected with qRT-PCR. Human colon tumours showed lower expression of ST2L as compared with adjacent non-tumour tissue (P<0.01). Moreover, the higher the tumour grade, the lower the expression of ST2L (P=0.026). Colon cancer cells expressed ST2 and IL-33 in vitro. Functional analyses showed that stimulation of tumour cells with IL-33 induced the expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). Knockdown of ST2 in murine colon cancer cells resulted in enhanced tumour growth (P<0.05) in BALB/c mice in vivo. This was associated with a decrease in macrophage infiltration, with IL-33-induced macrophage recruitment reduced by antagonising CCL2 in vitro. The IL-33/ST2 signalling axis may have a protective role in colon carcinogenesis.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 17 December 2015; doi:10.1038/bjc.2015.433 www.bjcancer.com.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 60 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 15%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 17 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2015.
All research outputs
#697,567
of 6,792,385 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Cancer
#771
of 3,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,533
of 291,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Cancer
#35
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,792,385 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,247 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.