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Profiling of microorganism-binding serum antibody specificities in professional athletes

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
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Title
Profiling of microorganism-binding serum antibody specificities in professional athletes
Published in
PLOS ONE, September 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0203665
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajna Minić, Zlatko Papić, Brižita Đorđević, Danica Michaličkova, Vesna Ilić, Geir Mathiesen, Irena Živković, Visnja Pantic, Ljiljana Dimitrijević

Abstract

The goal of this work was to elucidate similarities between microorganisms from the perspective of the humoral immune system reactivity in professional athletes. The reactivity of serum IgG of 14 young, individuals was analyzed to 23 selected microorganisms as antigens by use of the in house ELISA. Serum IgM and IgA reactivity was also analyzed and a control group of sex and age matched individuals was used for comparison. The obtained absorbance levels were used as a string of values to correlate the reactivity to different microorganisms. IgM was found to be the most cross reactive antibody class, Pearson's r = 0.7-0.92, for very distant bacterial species such as Lactobacillus and E. coli.High correlation in IgG levels was found for Gammaproteobacteria and LPS (from E. coli) (r = 0.77 for LPS vs. P. aeruginosa to r = 0.98 for LPS vs. E.coli), whereas this correlation was lower in the control group (r = 0.49 for LPS vs. P. aeruginosa to r = 0.66 for LPS vs. E.coli). The correlation was also analyzed between total IgG and IgG subclasses specific for the same microorganism, and IgG2 was identified as the main subclass recognising different microorganisms, as well as recognising LPS. Upon correlation of IgG with IgA for the same microorganism absence of or negative correlation was found between bacteria-specific IgA and IgG in case of Lactobacillus and Staphylococcusgeni, whereas correlation was absent or positive for Candida albicans, Enterococcusfaecalis,Streptococcus species tested in professional athletes. Opposite results were obtained for the control group. Outlined here is a simple experimental procedure and data analysis which yields functional significance and which can be used for determining the similarities between microorganisms from the aspect of the humoral immune system, for determining the main IgG subclass involved in an immune response as well as for the analysis of different target populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 29%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Unknown 6 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 7 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,168,176
of 20,581,464 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#38,756
of 177,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,374
of 294,108 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#287
of 964 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,581,464 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,108 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 964 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.