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Equity of Access to Critical Care Among Elderly Patients in Scotland: A National Cohort Study*

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care Medicine, January 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Equity of Access to Critical Care Among Elderly Patients in Scotland: A National Cohort Study*
Published in
Critical Care Medicine, January 2016
DOI 10.1097/ccm.0000000000001377
Pubmed ID
Authors

Docherty, Annemarie B, Anderson, Niall H, Walsh, Timothy S, Lone, Nazir I, Annemarie B. Docherty, Niall H. Anderson, Timothy S. Walsh, Nazir I. Lone

Abstract

To compare elderly (≥ 80 yr), older (65-79 yr), and younger (< 65 yr) ICU admissions in Scotland in relation to trends in admission rates, regional variation in admissions, ICU treatment intensity, and ICU and 1-year mortality. National 5-year cohort study of ICU first admissions (January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009). All admissions to ICUs and combined units (level 2/3 care) in Scotland captured by the Scottish Intensive Care Society Audit Group database, linked with hospital discharge data and death records. A total of 40,142 patients: 3,865 were 80 years old or older (9.6%), 13,904 (34.6%) were 65-79 years old; and 22,373 were younger than 65 years (55.7%). None. Between 2005 and 2009, elderly admission rates decreased from 36.6/10,000 (95% CI, 34.0-39.2) in 2005 to 28.7/10,000 (95% CI, 26.5-30.9) in 2009 (p < 0.001; relative decrease, 22.0%); older admission rates also decreased, but less steeply (31.1 [95% CI, 29.9-32.2] to 26.1 [95% CI, 25.1-27.1] per 10,000 population; p < 0.001; relative decrease, 16.1%). Rates were static for younger patients. Restricted to mechanically ventilated elderly patients, rates ranged from 13.9 to 30.1/10,000 between healthboard administrative regions (p < 0.001). Emergency surgical diagnoses were more prevalent for elderly patients (elderly, 39.8%; older, 25.1%; younger, 20.3%; p < 0.001). Subgroup analyses limited to pneumonia admissions (elderly, n = 242; older, n = 1,226; younger, n = 1,836) indicated similar acute physiology scores, but fewer preexisting comorbidities among elderly patients (p = 0.007), who received a shorter duration of organ support and ICU stay. Mortality rates were higher in elderly patients at ICU discharge (elderly, 26.5%; older, 25.0%; younger, 17.0%; p < 0.001; confounder adjusted odds ratio elderly vs younger, 2.33 [95% CI, 2.11-2.58]; p < 0.001). Differences persisted at 1 year (elderly, 52.2%; older, 43.8%; younger, 27.6%; adjusted odds ratio elderly vs younger, 3.72 [95% CI, 3.42-4.06]; p < 0.001). In Scotland, elderly and older ICU admission rates are decreasing, with regional geographic variation. Although limited by an absence of a measure of frailty, patient characteristics and treatment intensity suggest selection of less comorbid elderly patients, indicating possible rationing based on chronologic age.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 20%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 13%
Other 4 10%
Other 13 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 68%
Unspecified 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,135,131
of 10,993,399 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care Medicine
#1,089
of 6,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,417
of 320,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care Medicine
#49
of 184 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,993,399 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,015 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,802 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 184 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.