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Exploring malaria vector diversity on the Amazon Frontier

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2018
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3 tweeters

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Exploring malaria vector diversity on the Amazon Frontier
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2483-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian P. Bourke, Jan E. Conn, Tatiane M. P. de Oliveira, Leonardo S. M. Chaves, Eduardo S. Bergo, Gabriel Z. Laporta, Maria A. M. Sallum

Abstract

Deforestation in the Amazon and the social vulnerability of its settler communities has been associated with increased malaria incidence. The feeding biology of the most important malaria vectors in the region, notably Nyssorhynchus darlingi, compounds efforts to control vectors and reduce transmission of what has become known as "Frontier Malaria". Exploring Anophelinae mosquito diversity is fundamental to understanding the species responsible for transmission and developing appropriate management and intervention strategies for malaria control in the Amazon River basin. This study describes Anophelinae mosquito diversity from settler communities affected by Frontier Malaria in the states of Acre, Amazonas and Rondônia by analysing COI gene data using cluster and tree-based species delimitation approaches. In total, 270 specimens from collection sites were sequenced and these were combined with 151 reference (GenBank) sequences in the analysis to assist in species identification. Conservative estimates found that the number of species collected at these sites was between 23 (mPTP partition) and 27 (strict ABGD partition) species, up to 13 of which appeared to be new. Nyssorhynchus triannulatus and Nyssorhynchus braziliensis displayed exceptional levels of intraspecific genetic diversity but there was little to no support for putative species complex status. This study demonstrates that Anophelinae mosquito diversity continues to be underestimated in poorly sampled areas where frontier malaria is a major public health concern. The findings will help shape future studies of vector incrimination and transmission dynamics in these areas and support efforts to develop more effective vector control and transmission reduction strategies in settler communities in the Amazon River basin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 25%
Professor 2 17%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,516,150
of 13,568,727 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,995
of 3,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,866
of 265,071 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,727 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,951 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,071 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them