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Effects of Vitamin D and Exercise on the Wellbeing of Older Community-Dwelling Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Overview of attention for article published in Gerontology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
Effects of Vitamin D and Exercise on the Wellbeing of Older Community-Dwelling Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Published in
Gerontology, December 2015
DOI 10.1159/000442441
Pubmed ID
Authors

Radhika Patil, Saija Karinkanta, Kari Tokola, Pekka Kannus, Harri Sievänen, Kirsti Uusi-Rasi

Abstract

Evidence for the effects of exercise and vitamin D supplementation on quality of life (QoL), fear of falling (FoF) and mental wellbeing in older adults is conflicting. To study the effects of vitamin D supplementation and multimodal group exercise on psychosocial functions of wellbeing, including QoL, mental wellbeing and FoF. This is a 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled vitamin D and open exercise intervention trial with 409 older Finnish women (70-80 years of age) randomized to 4 treatment arms: (1) placebo without exercise, (2) vitamin D (800 IU/day) without exercise, (3) placebo and exercise, and (4) vitamin D (800 IU/day) with exercise. Exercisers participated in group exercise twice per week for 12 months and once per week for the subsequent 12 months, plus home exercises. When comparing with the placebo without exercise group, there were no statistically significant differences between groups receiving either vitamin D, exercise or both treatments for changes in QoL or mental wellbeing (although a slight decline was seen in mental wellbeing in those receiving vitamin D only, p = 0.044). The initial slight reduction in FoF was significant in all intervention groups compared with controls (p < 0.05), but this was only temporary. Neither vitamin D nor exercise contributes to better QoL, FoF or mental wellbeing in community-dwelling healthy older women with sufficient vitamin D levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 16%
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Lecturer 4 5%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 17 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 10 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Psychology 7 10%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2015.
All research outputs
#3,557,103
of 13,185,699 outputs
Outputs from Gerontology
#220
of 607 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,162
of 356,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gerontology
#25
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,185,699 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 607 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 356,744 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.