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Self-management of diabetes in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
Self-management of diabetes in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-6050-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Victor Stephani, Daniel Opoku, David Beran

Abstract

The prevalence of diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa has increased rapidly over the last years. Self-management is a key element for the proper management, but strategies are currently lacking in this context. This systematic review aims to describe the level of self-management among persons living with type 2 diabetes mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa. Relevant databases including PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched up to September 2016. Studies reporting self-management behavior of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus and living in sub-Saharan Africa were included. A total of 550 abstracts and 109 full-text articles were assessed. Forty-three studies, mainly observational, met the inclusion criteria. The studies showed that patients rarely self-monitored their glucose levels, had low frequency/duration of physical activity, moderately adhered to recommended dietary and medication behavior, had poor level of knowledge regarding diabetes related complications and sought traditional or herbal medicines beside of their biomedical treatment. The analysis also revealed a lack of studies on psychosocial aspects. Except for the psychosocial area, there is a good amount of recent studies on self-management behavior of type 2 diabetes mellitus sub-Saharan Africa. These studies indicate that self-management in sub-Saharan Africa is poor and therefore a serious threat to the health of individuals and the health systems capacity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Researcher 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 18 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 18 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2020.
All research outputs
#507,486
of 16,219,251 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#477
of 11,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,403
of 278,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#2
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,219,251 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,144 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.