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Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Methods, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
37 tweeters
patent
4 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
4 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
487 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands
Published in
Nature Methods, December 2015
DOI 10.1038/nmeth.3696
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noah D Taylor, Alexander S Garruss, Rocco Moretti, Sum Chan, Mark A Arbing, Duilio Cascio, Jameson K Rogers, Farren J Isaacs, Sriram Kosuri, David Baker, Stanley Fields, George M Church, Srivatsan Raman

Abstract

Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 487 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Lithuania 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 468 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 160 33%
Researcher 101 21%
Student > Master 57 12%
Student > Bachelor 57 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 4%
Other 63 13%
Unknown 28 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 171 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 149 31%
Chemistry 38 8%
Engineering 24 5%
Chemical Engineering 13 3%
Other 42 9%
Unknown 50 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 101. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2020.
All research outputs
#205,445
of 15,606,051 outputs
Outputs from Nature Methods
#296
of 4,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,926
of 368,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Methods
#7
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,051 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,122 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 368,756 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.