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Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, December 2015
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Title
Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms
Published in
Scientific Reports, December 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep18578
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shoufeng Yang, Iain D. Hay, David R. Cameron, Mary Speir, Bintao Cui, Feifei Su, Anton Y. Peleg, Trevor Lithgow, Margaret A. Deighton, Yue Qu

Abstract

Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of "persister cells" were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Chile 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Unspecified 4 9%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,824,607
of 6,810,016 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#20,548
of 24,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,530
of 295,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#2,039
of 2,428 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,810,016 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 24,246 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,429 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,428 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.