↓ Skip to main content

Organic amendments for risk mitigation of organochlorine pesticide residues in old orchard soils

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Pollution, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Organic amendments for risk mitigation of organochlorine pesticide residues in old orchard soils
Published in
Environmental Pollution, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.11.039
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tiziana Centofanti, Laura L. McConnell, Rufus L. Chaney, W. Nelson Beyer, Natasha A. Andrade, Cathleen J. Hapeman, Alba Torrents, Anh Nguyen, Marya O. Anderson, Jeffrey M. Novak, Dana Jackson

Abstract

Performance of compost and biochar amendments for in situ risk mitigation of aged DDT, DDE and dieldrin residues in an old orchard soil was examined. The change in bioavailability of pesticide residues to Lumbricus terrestris L. relative to the unamended control soil was assessed using 4-L soil microcosms with and without plant cover in a 48-day experiment. The use of aged dairy manure compost and biosolids compost was found to be effective, especially in the planted treatments, at lowering the bioavailability factor (BAF) by 18-39%; however, BAF results for DDT in the unplanted soil treatments were unaffected or increased. The pine chip biochar utilized in this experiment was ineffective at lower the BAF of pesticides in the soil. The US EPA Soil Screening Level approach was used with our measured values. Addition of 10% of the aged dairy manure compost reduced the average hazard quotient values to below 1.0 for DDT + DDE and dieldrin. Results indicate this sustainable approach is appropriate to minimize risks to wildlife in areas of marginal organochlorine pesticide contamination. Application of this remediation approach has potential for use internationally in areas where historical pesticide contamination of soils remains a threat to wildlife populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 16%
Chemical Engineering 2 5%
Unspecified 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 14 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2015.
All research outputs
#7,641,112
of 12,279,872 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Pollution
#2,029
of 3,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,024
of 332,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Pollution
#42
of 157 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,279,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,929 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,608 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 157 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.