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The effects of sexual violence on psychosocial outcomes in formerly abducted girls in Northern Uganda: the WAYS study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, December 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
The effects of sexual violence on psychosocial outcomes in formerly abducted girls in Northern Uganda: the WAYS study
Published in
BMC Psychology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40359-015-0103-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kennedy Amone-P’Olak, Emilio Ovuga, Peter Brian Jones

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of sexual violence on the odds of different psychosocial outcomes (depression, psychotic symptoms, somatic complaints, conduct problems, daily functioning, community relations, and stigma) among formerly abducted girls in Uganda. Data from an on-going War-Affected Youth Study (WAYS) in Uganda was used to compute the prevalence of psychosocial problems (scores ≥ 75th percentile) among three categories of formerly abducted girls (1) no history of sexual violence without children, 2) a history of sexual violence without children, and 3) a history of sexual violence with children as a consequence) among 210 women (age 22.06, SD = 2.06, range 18-25). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine differences in psychosocial outcomes by the different categories of formerly abducted girls. Compared to participants with no history of sexual violence and without any children, the odds of adverse psychosocial outcomes were increasingly higher for all psychosocial dimensions for those who reported sexual violence with or without children. Those with a history of sexual violence and with children as a consequence had more than five times the odds of reporting depressive symptoms (OR, 5.37; 95 % CI (1.45-19.90), somatic complaints (OR, 6.59; 95 % CI (1.80 - 24.11), and stigma (OR, 13.85; 95 % CI (3.73 - 51.42) compared to those who did not report sexual violence. This study highlighted the risks of psychosocial problems among different categories of formerly abducted girls regarding sexual violence. Vulnerability to psychosocial problems among formerly abducted girls is further compounded by sexual violence, child care, stigma, and poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 72 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Researcher 5 7%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 17 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 25%
Psychology 16 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Materials Science 2 3%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2016.
All research outputs
#4,061,720
of 14,413,566 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#193
of 337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,655
of 363,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#17
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,413,566 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 337 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.