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Injury deaths in the adolescent population of Finland: a 43-year secular trend analysis between 1971 and 2013

Overview of attention for article published in Injury Prevention, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Injury deaths in the adolescent population of Finland: a 43-year secular trend analysis between 1971 and 2013
Published in
Injury Prevention, December 2015
DOI 10.1136/injuryprev-2015-041798
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jari Parkkari, Harri Sievänen, Seppo Niemi, Ville M Mattila, Pekka Kannus

Abstract

Injuries are a major public health problem worldwide, being the leading cause of death in children and adolescents in developed countries. However, knowledge on recent secular trends in injury deaths of adolescents is sparse. Using Official Cause-of-Death Statistics of Finland, we examined the nationwide trends in the age- and sex-specific incidence rates of fatal injuries among 10-14-year-old and 15-19-year-old adolescents in Finland between 1971 and 2013. The incidence rate of fatal injuries decreased considerably in both age groups during the 43-year follow-up period. The decline in injury deaths was mainly due to decreased deaths in traffic accidents. The number of drownings reached the ultimate goal-that is, there were no drownings in Finnish 10-19-year-old adolescents in 2013. The rates of intentional injury deaths remained stable in girls, while in 15-19-year-old boys a decreasing trend was evident. During the deep economic depression in 1990, the incidence of suicide in 15-19-year-old boys was as high as 40.1. At that time, boys' suicide risk was 7.4 times higher than that of girls. Since then, boys' risk for suicide has clearly decreased and was 1.6 times higher than the corresponding risk in girls in 2013. The incidence rate of fatal injuries decreased considerably in Finnish adolescents during the period 1971-2013. The clearest change occurred in road traffic injuries and drownings. The rates of intentional injury deaths remained unaltered in girls while 15-19-year-old boys showed a decreasing trend.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 22%
Student > Master 5 19%
Other 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 30%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Sports and Recreations 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,752,973
of 12,458,271 outputs
Outputs from Injury Prevention
#1,024
of 1,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,980
of 345,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Injury Prevention
#27
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,458,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,394 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.