↓ Skip to main content

Frequencies distribution of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum population from…

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Frequencies distribution of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum population from Hadhramout Governorate, Yemen
Published in
Malaria Journal, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-1035-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Omar A. A. Bamaga, Mohammed A. K. Mahdy, Yvonne A. L. Lim

Abstract

Malaria in Yemen is mainly caused by Plasmodium falciparum and 25 % of the population is at high risk. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) had been used as monotherapy against P. falciparum. Emergence of chloroquine resistance led to the shift in anti-malarial treatment policy in Yemen to artemisinin-based combination therapy, that is artesunate (AS) plus SP as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria and artemether-lumefantrine as second-line treatment. This study aimed to screen mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps) genes associated with SP resistance among P. falciparum population in Hadhramout governorate, Yemen. Genomic DNA was extracted from dried blood spots of 137 P. falciparum isolates collected from a community-based study. DNA was amplified using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes. Sequences were analysed for mutations in Pfdhfr gene codons 51, 59, 108, and 164 and in Pfdhps gene codons 436, 437, and 540. A total of 128 and 114 P. falciparum isolates were successfully sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes, respectively. Each Pfdhfr mutant allele (I 51 and N 108 ) in P. falciparum population had a frequency of 84 %. Pfdhfr R 59 mutant allele was detected in one isolate. Mutation at codon 437 (G 437 ) in the Pfdhps gene was detected in 44.7 % of falciparum malaria isolates. Frequencies of Pfdhfr double mutant genotype (I 51 C59 N 108 I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps triple mutant genotype (I 51 C59 N 108I164-S436 G 437K540) were 82.8 and 39.3 %, respectively. One isolate harboured Pfdhfr triple mutant genotype (I 51 , R 59 , N 108 , I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps quadruple mutant genotype (I 51 R 59 N 108I164-S436 G 437K540). High frequencies of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles and genotypes in P. falciparum population in Hadhramout, Yemen, highlight the risk of developing resistance for SP, the partner drug of AS, which subsequently will expose the parasite to AS monotherapy increasing then the potential of the emergence of AS resistance. Study findings necessitate the continuous monitoring of the efficacy of the national anti-malarial drugs policy in Yemen. In addition, monitoring SP efficacy using molecular markers that has shown to be a practical and informative method for monitoring the partner drug of AS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Researcher 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,114,678
of 6,865,651 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,877
of 2,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,253
of 295,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#114
of 168 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,865,651 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,330 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,826 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 168 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.