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Inter-comparison of dynamic models for radionuclide transfer to marine biota in a Fukushima accident scenario

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, March 2016
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Title
Inter-comparison of dynamic models for radionuclide transfer to marine biota in a Fukushima accident scenario
Published in
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2015.12.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Vives i Batlle, N.A. Beresford, K. Beaugelin-Seiller, R. Bezhenar, J. Brown, J.-J. Cheng, M. Ćujić, S. Dragović, C. Duffa, B. Fiévet, A. Hosseini, K.T. Jung, S. Kamboj, D.-K. Keum, A. Kryshev, D. LePoire, V. Maderich, B.-I. Min, R. Periáñez, T. Sazykina, K.-S. Suh, C. Yu, C. Wang, R. Heling

Abstract

We report an inter-comparison of eight models designed to predict the radiological exposure of radionuclides in marine biota. The models were required to simulate dynamically the uptake and turnover of radionuclides by marine organisms. Model predictions of radionuclide uptake and turnover using kinetic calculations based on biological half-life (TB1/2) and/or more complex metabolic modelling approaches were used to predict activity concentrations and, consequently, dose rates of (90)Sr, (131)I and (137)Cs to fish, crustaceans, macroalgae and molluscs under circumstances where the water concentrations are changing with time. For comparison, the ERICA Tool, a model commonly used in environmental assessment, and which uses equilibrium concentration ratios, was also used. As input to the models we used hydrodynamic forecasts of water and sediment activity concentrations using a simulated scenario reflecting the Fukushima accident releases. Although model variability is important, the intercomparison gives logical results, in that the dynamic models predict consistently a pattern of delayed rise of activity concentration in biota and slow decline instead of the instantaneous equilibrium with the activity concentration in seawater predicted by the ERICA Tool. The differences between ERICA and the dynamic models increase the shorter the TB1/2 becomes; however, there is significant variability between models, underpinned by parameter and methodological differences between them. The need to validate the dynamic models used in this intercomparison has been highlighted, particularly in regards to optimisation of the model biokinetic parameters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 31%
Other 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Professor 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 24 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Engineering 3 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2015.
All research outputs
#11,737,437
of 15,384,700 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Radioactivity
#865
of 1,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,745
of 368,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Radioactivity
#31
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,384,700 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,141 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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