↓ Skip to main content

Floral uniformity through evolutionary time in a species‐rich tree lineage

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, October 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
25 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Floral uniformity through evolutionary time in a species‐rich tree lineage
Published in
New Phytologist, October 2018
DOI 10.1111/nph.15453
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thais N. C. Vasconcelos, Marion Chartier, Gerhard Prenner, Aline C. Martins, Jürg Schönenberger, Astrid Wingler, Eve Lucas

Abstract

Changes in floral morphology are expected across evolutionary time and are often promoted as important drivers in angiosperm diversification. Such a statement, however, is in contrast to empirical observations of species-rich lineages that show apparent conservative floral morphologies even under strong selective pressure to change from their environments. Here, we provide quantitative evidence for prolific speciation despite uniform floral morphology in a tropical species-rich tree lineage. We analyse floral disparity in the environmental and phylogenetic context of Myrcia (Myrtaceae), one of the most diverse and abundant tree genera in Neotropical biomes. Variation in floral morphology among Myrcia clades is exceptionally low, even among distantly related species. Discrete floral specialisations do occur, but these are few, present low phylogenetic signal, have no strong correlation with abiotic factors, and do not affect overall macroevolutionary dynamics in the lineage. Results show that floral form and function may be conserved over large evolutionary time scales even in environments full of opportunities for ecological interactions and niche specialisation. Species accumulation in diverse lineages with uniform flowers apparently does not result from shifts in pollination strategies, but from speciation mechanisms that involve other, nonfloral plant traits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 23%
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Master 8 9%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 11%
Environmental Science 7 8%
Mathematics 1 1%
Sports and Recreations 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 12 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2019.
All research outputs
#741,422
of 15,524,981 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#617
of 6,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,906
of 276,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#24
of 119 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,524,981 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,365 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,168 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 119 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.