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Ecosystem heterogeneity determines the ecological resilience of the Amazon to climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
49 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
504 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Ecosystem heterogeneity determines the ecological resilience of the Amazon to climate change
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1511344112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naomi M. Levine, Ke Zhang, Marcos Longo, Alessandro Baccini, Oliver L. Phillips, Simon L. Lewis, Esteban Alvarez-Dávila, Ana Cristina Segalin de Andrade, Roel J. W. Brienen, Terry L. Erwin, Ted R. Feldpausch, Abel Lorenzo Monteagudo Mendoza, Percy Nuñez Vargas, Adriana Prieto, Javier Eduardo Silva-Espejo, Yadvinder Malhi, Paul R. Moorcroft

Abstract

Amazon forests, which store ∼50% of tropical forest carbon and play a vital role in global water, energy, and carbon cycling, are predicted to experience both longer and more intense dry seasons by the end of the 21st century. However, the climate sensitivity of this ecosystem remains uncertain: several studies have predicted large-scale die-back of the Amazon, whereas several more recent studies predict that the biome will remain largely intact. Combining remote-sensing and ground-based observations with a size- and age-structured terrestrial ecosystem model, we explore the sensitivity and ecological resilience of these forests to changes in climate. We demonstrate that water stress operating at the scale of individual plants, combined with spatial variation in soil texture, explains observed patterns of variation in ecosystem biomass, composition, and dynamics across the region, and strongly influences the ecosystem's resilience to changes in dry season length. Specifically, our analysis suggests that in contrast to existing predictions of either stability or catastrophic biomass loss, the Amazon forest's response to a drying regional climate is likely to be an immediate, graded, heterogeneous transition from high-biomass moist forests to transitional dry forests and woody savannah-like states. Fire, logging, and other anthropogenic disturbances may, however, exacerbate these climate change-induced ecosystem transitions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 504 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 5 <1%
United States 4 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 486 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 119 24%
Researcher 94 19%
Student > Master 70 14%
Student > Bachelor 37 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 36 7%
Other 98 19%
Unknown 50 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 170 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 148 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 60 12%
Engineering 13 3%
Social Sciences 7 1%
Other 27 5%
Unknown 79 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 127. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2019.
All research outputs
#157,503
of 15,706,456 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3,483
of 85,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,553
of 369,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#110
of 851 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,706,456 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85,730 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 851 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.