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Drivers of household food availability in sub-Saharan Africa based on big data from small farms

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
24 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Drivers of household food availability in sub-Saharan Africa based on big data from small farms
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1518384112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Romain Frelat, Santiago Lopez-Ridaura, Ken E. Giller, Mario Herrero, Sabine Douxchamps, Agnes Andersson Djurfeldt, Olaf Erenstein, Ben Henderson, Menale Kassie, Birthe K. Paul, Cyrille Rigolot, Randall S. Ritzema, Daniel Rodriguez, Piet J. A. van Asten, Mark T. van Wijk, Frelata, Romain, Asten, Piet J A van, Henderson, Ben, Douxchamps, Sabine, Rodriguez, Daniel, Paul, Birthe, Kassie, Menale, Herrero, Mario, Lopez-Ridaura, Santiago, Wijk, Mark T. van, Rigolot, Cyrille, Giller, Ken E, Ritzema, Randall S, Djurfeldt, Agnes Andersson, Erenstein, Olaf, Frelat, Romain, Paul, Birthe K, van Asten, Piet J A, van Wijk, Mark T, Frelat, Romain., Lopez-Ridaur, Santiago

Abstract

We calculated a simple indicator of food availability using data from 93 sites in 17 countries across contrasted agroecologies in sub-Saharan Africa (>13,000 farm households) and analyzed the drivers of variations in food availability. Crop production was the major source of energy, contributing 60% of food availability. The off-farm income contribution to food availability ranged from 12% for households without enough food available (18% of the total sample) to 27% for the 58% of households with sufficient food available. Using only three explanatory variables (household size, number of livestock, and land area), we were able to predict correctly the agricultural determined status of food availability for 72% of the households, but the relationships were strongly influenced by the degree of market access. Our analyses suggest that targeting poverty through improving market access and off-farm opportunities is a better strategy to increase food security than focusing on agricultural production and closing yield gaps. This calls for multisectoral policy harmonization, incentives, and diversification of employment sources rather than a singular focus on agricultural development. Recognizing and understanding diversity among smallholder farm households in sub-Saharan Africa is key for the design of policies that aim to improve food security.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 3 3%
United States 3 3%
Netherlands 3 3%
Spain 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 91 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 23%
Researcher 24 22%
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 20 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 35%
Environmental Science 24 22%
Social Sciences 15 14%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 10 9%
Unspecified 6 6%
Other 15 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 73. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2017.
All research outputs
#119,446
of 8,166,903 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3,310
of 46,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,574
of 316,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#198
of 946 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,166,903 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46,189 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 946 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.