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Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in CT Enterography

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Roentgenology, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in CT Enterography
Published in
American Journal of Roentgenology, December 2015
DOI 10.2214/ajr.14.13321
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin P. Murphy, Lee Crush, Maria Twomey, Patrick D. McLaughlin, Iris C. Mildenberger, Niamh Moore, Jackie Bye, Owen J. O'Connor, Sean E. McSweeney, Fergus Shanahan, Michael M. Maher

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance of pure model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in low-dose CT enterography. Forty-four patients with Crohn disease referred for CT enterography were included. Low-dose modified-protocol and conventional-protocol CT datasets were contemporaneously acquired. Conventional-protocol image formation was performed with 40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Modified-protocol data were reconstructed with 100% MBIR and 40% ASIR. Image quality was assessed subjectively and objectively at six levels. Independent clinical interpretations by two fully blinded radiologists were compared with reference standard consensus reviews by two nonblinded readers who had access to clinical information, previous imaging studies, and medical records. A 74.7% average radiation dose reduction was seen: low-dose modified-protocol effective dose, 1.61 ± 1.18 mSv (size-specific-dose-estimate, 2.47 ± 1.21 mGy); conventional-protocol effective dose, 6.05 ± 2.84 mSv (size-specific-dose-estimate, 9.25 ± 2.9 mGy). Image quality assessment yielded 9372 data points. Objective noise on modified-protocol MBIR images was superior (p < 0.05) to that with the conventional protocol at three of six levels and comparable at the other three levels. Modified-protocol images were superior to conventional-protocol ASIR images (p < 0.05 in all cases) for subjective noise, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, streak artifact, and diagnostic acceptability on coronal reconstructions. Axial diagnostic acceptability was superior for conventional-protocol ASIR (p = 0.76). For both readers, modified-protocol MBIR clinical readings agreed more closely with reference standard readings than did conventional-protocol ASIR readings with regard to bowel wall disease assessment (κ = 0.589 and 0.700 vs 0.583 and 0.564). Overall Crohn disease activity grade (κ = 0.549 and 0.441 vs 0.315 and 0.596) and detection of acute complications (κ = 1.0 and 0.689 vs 0.896 and 0.896) were comparable when evaluated on conventional-protocol ASIR and modified-protocol MBIR images. Low-dose CT enterography with MBIR yields images that are comparable to or superior to conventional images.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 31%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Lecturer 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 56%
Engineering 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2016.
All research outputs
#8,938,260
of 15,838,743 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Roentgenology
#3,763
of 5,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,933
of 371,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Roentgenology
#39
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,838,743 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,441 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.