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HeLP-Diabetes: randomised controlled trial protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
263 Mendeley
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Title
HeLP-Diabetes: randomised controlled trial protocol
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-1246-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth Murray, Charlotte Dack, Maria Barnard, Andrew Farmer, Jinshuo Li, Susan Michie, Kingshuk Pal, Steve Parrott, Jamie Ross, Michael Sweeting, Bindie Wood, Lucy Yardley

Abstract

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is common, affecting nearly 400 million people worldwide. Achieving good health for people with T2DM requires active self-management; however, uptake of self-management education is poor, and there is an urgent need to find better, more acceptable, cost-effective methods of providing self-management support. Web-based self-management support has many potential benefits for patients and health services. The aim of this trial is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a web-based self-management support programme for people with T2DM. This will be a multi-centre individually randomised controlled trial in primary care, recruiting adults with T2DM who are registered with participating general practices in England. Participants will be randomised to receive either an evidence-based, theoretically informed, web-based self-management programme for people with T2DM which addresses medical, emotional, and role management, called Healthy Living for People with type 2 Diabetes (HeLP-Diabetes) or a simple information website. The joint primary outcomes are glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and diabetes-related distress, measured by the Problem Areas In Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular risk factors, depression and anxiety, and self-efficacy for self-management of diabetes. Health economic data include health service use, costs due to the intervention, and EQ-5D for calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYS). Data will be collected at baseline, 3 months and 12 months, with the primary endpoint at 12 months. Practice nurses, blinded to patient allocation, collect clinical data; patients complete online questionnaires for patient reported measures. A sample size of 350 recruited participants allows for attrition of up to 15 % and will provide 90 % power of detecting at a 5 % significance level a true average difference in the PAID score of 4.0 and 0.25 % change in HbA1c (both small effect sizes). The analysis will follow a pre-specified analysis plan, based on comparing the groups as randomised (intention-to-treat). The findings of this trial are likely to be of interest to policy makers, clinicians, and commissioners, all of whom are actively seeking additional forms of self-management support for people with T2DM. The Trial Registration number is ISRCTN 02123133 ; date of registration 14.2.13.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 263 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 260 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 56 21%
Student > Master 43 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 11%
Researcher 27 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 9%
Other 47 18%
Unknown 37 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 98 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 56 21%
Psychology 22 8%
Social Sciences 11 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 2%
Other 24 9%
Unknown 47 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2016.
All research outputs
#867,444
of 6,992,211 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#375
of 2,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,618
of 303,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#10
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,992,211 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,680 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.