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Observed decrease in atmospheric mercury explained by global decline in anthropogenic emissions

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
33 tweeters
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
248 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
229 Mendeley
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Title
Observed decrease in atmospheric mercury explained by global decline in anthropogenic emissions
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1516312113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yanxu Zhang, Daniel J. Jacob, Hannah M. Horowitz, Long Chen, Helen M. Amos, David P. Krabbenhoft, Franz Slemr, Vincent L. St. Louis, Elsie M. Sunderland

Abstract

Observations of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) at sites in North America and Europe show large decreases (∼1-2% y(-1)) from 1990 to present. Observations in background northern hemisphere air, including Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) and CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) aircraft flights, show weaker decreases (<1% y(-1)). These decreases are inconsistent with current global emission inventories indicating flat or increasing emissions over that period. However, the inventories have three major flaws: (i) they do not account for the decline in atmospheric release of Hg from commercial products; (ii) they are biased in their estimate of artisanal and small-scale gold mining emissions; and (iii) they do not properly account for the change in Hg(0)/Hg(II) speciation of emissions from coal-fired utilities after implementation of emission controls targeted at SO2 and NOx. We construct an improved global emission inventory for the period 1990 to 2010 accounting for the above factors and find a 20% decrease in total Hg emissions and a 30% decrease in anthropogenic Hg(0) emissions, with much larger decreases in North America and Europe offsetting the effect of increasing emissions in Asia. Implementation of our inventory in a global 3D atmospheric Hg simulation [GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observing System-Chemistry)] coupled to land and ocean reservoirs reproduces the observed large-scale trends in atmospheric Hg(0) concentrations and in Hg(II) wet deposition. The large trends observed in North America and Europe reflect the phase-out of Hg from commercial products as well as the cobenefit from SO2 and NOx emission controls on coal-fired utilities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 229 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 227 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 21%
Researcher 42 18%
Student > Master 38 17%
Student > Bachelor 20 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 6%
Other 34 15%
Unknown 34 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 73 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 22 10%
Chemistry 20 9%
Engineering 19 8%
Other 16 7%
Unknown 57 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 283. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2019.
All research outputs
#100,450
of 22,549,926 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,256
of 97,922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,903
of 408,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#45
of 849 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,549,926 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 97,922 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,385 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 849 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.