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Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study

Overview of attention for article published in British Medical Journal, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 44,073)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
132 news outlets
blogs
25 blogs
policy
5 policy sources
twitter
839 tweeters
facebook
35 Facebook pages
googleplus
9 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
296 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
661 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study
Published in
British Medical Journal, January 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmj.h6704
Pubmed ID
Authors

M Arantxa Colchero, Barry M Popkin, Juan A Rivera, Shu Wen Ng

Abstract

 What has been the effect on purchases of beverages from stores in Mexico one year after implementation of the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages?  In this observational study the authors used data on the purchase of beverages in Mexico from January 2012 to December 2014 from an unbalanced panel of 6253 households providing 205 112 observations in 53 cities with more than 50 000 inhabitants. To test whether the post-tax trend in purchases was significantly different from the pretax trend, the authors used a difference in difference fixed effects model, which adjusts for both macroeconomic variables that can affect the purchase of beverages over time, and pre-existing trends. The variables used in the analysis included demographic information on household composition (age and sex of household members) and socioeconomic status (low, middle, and high). The authors compared the predicted volumes (mL/capita/day) of taxed and untaxed beverages purchased in 2014-the observed post-tax period-with the estimated volumes that would have been purchased if the tax had not been implemented (counterfactual) based on pretax trends.  Relative to the counterfactual in 2014, purchases of taxed beverages decreased by an average of 6% (-12 mL/capita/day), and decreased at an increasing rate up to a 12% decline by December 2014. All three socioeconomic groups reduced purchases of taxed beverages, but reductions were higher among the households of low socioeconomic status, averaging a 9% decline during 2014, and up to a 17% decrease by December 2014 compared with pretax trends. Purchases of untaxed beverages were 4% (36 mL/capita/day) higher than the counterfactual, mainly driven by an increase in purchases of bottled plain water.  The tax on sugar sweetened beverages was associated with reductions in purchases of taxed beverages and increases in purchases of untaxed beverages. Continued monitoring is needed to understand purchases longer term, potential substitutions, and health implications.  This work was supported by grants from Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and by the Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública and the Carolina Population Center. The authors have no competing interests. No additional data are available.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 839 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 661 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Malta 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 649 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 201 30%
Student > Bachelor 116 18%
Researcher 75 11%
Unspecified 71 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 10%
Other 133 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 164 25%
Unspecified 106 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 89 13%
Social Sciences 74 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 73 11%
Other 155 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1812. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2019.
All research outputs
#963
of 13,387,598 outputs
Outputs from British Medical Journal
#40
of 44,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34
of 359,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Medical Journal
#2
of 906 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,387,598 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 44,073 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,816 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 906 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.