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Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
151 Mendeley
Title
Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep18715
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Rix, Jasper M. de Goeij, Christina E. Mueller, Ulrich Struck, Jack J. Middelburg, Fleur C. van Duyl, Fuad A. Al-Horani, Christian Wild, Malik S. Naumann, Dick van Oevelen

Abstract

Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Netherlands 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 142 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 26%
Student > Master 35 23%
Researcher 28 19%
Student > Bachelor 17 11%
Unspecified 9 6%
Other 23 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 54%
Environmental Science 28 19%
Unspecified 12 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 7%
Other 8 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 41. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2016.
All research outputs
#294,624
of 11,271,704 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#3,515
of 48,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,635
of 330,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#248
of 2,798 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,271,704 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 48,059 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,798 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.