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Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents and association with computer and videogame use

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 419)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
202 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents and association with computer and videogame use
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2015.06.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Georgia Rodrigues Reis Silva, Ana Carolina Rodarti Pitangui, Michele Katherine Andrade Xavier, Marco Aurélio Valois Correia-Júnior, Rodrigo Cappato De Araújo

Abstract

This study investigated the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in high school adolescents from public schools and its association with electronic device use. The sample consisted of 961 boys and girls aged 14-19 years who answered a questionnaire regarding the use of computers and electronic games, and questions about pain symptoms and physical activity. Furthermore, anthropometric assessments of all volunteers were performed. The chi-squared test and a multiple logistic regression model were used for the inferential analysis. The presence of musculoskeletal pain symptoms was reported by 65.1% of the adolescents, being more prevalent in the thoracolumbar spine (46.9%), followed by pain in the upper limbs, representing 20% of complaints. The mean time of use for computers and electronic games was 1.720 and 583minutes per week, respectively. The excessive use of electronic devices was demonstrated to be a risk factor for cervical and lumbar pain. Female gender was associated with the presence of pain in different body parts. Presence of a paid job was associated with cervical pain. A high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents, as well as an increased amount of time using digital devices was observed. However, it was only possible to observe an association between the increased use of these devices and the presence of cervical and low back pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 202 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 199 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 47 23%
Student > Master 36 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 7%
Researcher 12 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 3%
Other 34 17%
Unknown 52 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 33 16%
Sports and Recreations 20 10%
Psychology 9 4%
Social Sciences 7 3%
Other 38 19%
Unknown 62 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,059,582
of 12,546,249 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#49
of 419 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,595
of 352,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,546,249 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 419 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,802 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.