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Proximate cues to phases of movement in a highly dispersive waterfowl, Anas superciliosa

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, September 2015
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Title
Proximate cues to phases of movement in a highly dispersive waterfowl, Anas superciliosa
Published in
Movement Ecology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40462-015-0048-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

John F. McEvoy, David A. Roshier, Raoul F. H. Ribot, Andy T. D. Bennett

Abstract

Waterfowl can exploit distant ephemeral wetlands in arid environments and provide valuable insights into the response of birds to rapid environmental change, and behavioural flexibility of avian movements. Currently much of our understanding of behavioural flexibility of avian movement comes from studies of migration in seasonally predictable biomes in the northern hemisphere. We used GPS transmitters to track 20 Pacific black duck (Anas superciliosa) in arid central Australia. We exploited La Niña conditions that brought extensive flooding, so allowing a rare opportunity to investigate how weather and other environmental factors predict initiation of long distance movement toward freshly flooded habitats. We employed behavioural change point analysis to identify three phases of movement: sedentary, exploratory and long distance oriented movement. We then used random forest models to determine the ability of meteorological and remote sensed landscape variables to predict initiation of these phases. We found that initiation of exploratory movement phases is influenced by fluctuations in local weather conditions and accumulated rainfall in the landscape. Initiation of long distance movement phases was found to be highly individualistic with minor influence from local weather conditions. Our study reveals how individuals utilise local conditions to respond to changes in resource distribution at broad scales. Our findings suggest that individual movement decisions of dispersive birds are informed by the integration of multiple weather cues operating at different temporal and spatial scales.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 29%
Researcher 8 21%
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 39%
Environmental Science 12 32%
Mathematics 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2016.
All research outputs
#7,853,530
of 12,516,289 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#109
of 138 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,577
of 351,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#16
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,516,289 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 138 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.5. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.