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Salt intakes in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-regression

Overview of attention for article published in Population Health Metrics, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Salt intakes in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-regression
Published in
Population Health Metrics, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12963-015-0068-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oyinlola Oyebode, Samuel Oti, Yen-Fu Chen, Richard J. Lilford

Abstract

High sodium intake increases the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. For this reason the World Health Organization recommends a maximum intake of 2 g per day and a 30 % reduction in population sodium intake by 2025. However, in global reviews, data on sodium intake in sub-Saharan Africa have been limited. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies reporting sodium intake in sub-Saharan African populations. Meta-regression analyses were used to test the effect of year of data collection and method of data collection (urinary/dietary), as well as any association between sex, urban/rural status or a country's economic development, and population sodium intake. We identified 42 papers reporting 67 estimates of adult population sodium intakes and 12 estimates of child population sodium intakes since 1967. Of the 67 adult populations, 54 (81 %) consumed more than 2 g sodium/day, as did four of the 12 (33 %) child populations. Sixty-five adult estimates were included in the meta-regression, which found that urban populations consumed higher amounts of salt than rural populations and that urine collection gave lower estimates of sodium intake than dietary data. Sodium intake in much of sub-Saharan Africa is above the World Health Organization's recommended maximum intake and may be set to increase as the continent undergoes considerable urbanization. Few identified studies used stringent measurement criteria or representative population samples. High quality studies will be required to identify where and with whom to intervene, in order to meet the World Health Organization's target of a 30 % reduction in population sodium intake and to demonstrate progress towards this target.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 27%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Researcher 7 12%
Unspecified 7 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Other 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 18%
Unspecified 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Other 11 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,924,595
of 11,333,579 outputs
Outputs from Population Health Metrics
#134
of 263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,918
of 331,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Population Health Metrics
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,333,579 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 263 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,404 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.