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Impact of adenotonsillectomy on vocal emission in children

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, March 2016
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Title
Impact of adenotonsillectomy on vocal emission in children
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjorl.2015.11.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Spyros Cardoso Dimatos, Luciano Rodrigues Neves, Jéssica Monique Beltrame, Renata Rangel Azevedo, Shirley Shizue Nagata Pignatari

Abstract

Adenotonsillectomy is the most common surgery performed by otolaryngologists in pediatric age, and one of the most frequently asked questions about the postoperative period is whether there is a potential for change in vocal pattern of these children. To evaluate the impact of adenotonsillectomy in the voice emission pattern of children with hypertrophy of palatine and pharyngeal tonsils. This is a prospective study in which we carried out perceptual auditory assessments and acoustic analysis of 26 children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy at three time points: before surgery, one month and three months after surgery. The following acoustic parameters were estimated using the Praat software: fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic-noise ratio. A statistically significant change was found between shimmer and harmonic-noise ratio during vowel /u/ production between the preoperative and 1st month postoperative time points. No significant differences were detected for acoustic parameters between preoperative analysis and that of the 3rd month post-operation. Transient changes in acoustic parameters occur in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy submitted to adenotonsillectomy, progressing to normalization in the 3rd postoperative month.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 27%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Other 2 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 5%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 14%
Engineering 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Linguistics 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2016.
All research outputs
#11,105,708
of 12,488,416 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#206
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#288,438
of 350,412 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,488,416 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,412 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.