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Somatically mutated ABL 1 is an actionable and essential NSCLC survival gene

Overview of attention for article published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
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Title
Somatically mutated ABL 1 is an actionable and essential NSCLC survival gene
Published in
EMBO Molecular Medicine, January 2016
DOI 10.15252/emmm.201505456
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ewelina Testoni, Natalie L Stephenson, Pedro Torres‐Ayuso, Anna A Marusiak, Eleanor W Trotter, Andrew Hudson, Cassandra L Hodgkinson, Christopher J Morrow, Caroline Dive, John Brognard

Abstract

The lack of actionable mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a significant hurdle in the design of targeted therapies for this disease. Here, we identify somatically mutated ABL1 as a genetic dependency that is required to maintain NSCLC cell survival. We demonstrate that NSCLC cells with ABL1 mutations are sensitive to ABL inhibitors and we verify that the drug-induced effects on cell viability are specific to pharmacological inhibition of the ABL1 kinase. Furthermore, we confirm that imatinib suppresses lung tumor growth in vivo, specifically in lung cancer cells harboring a gain-of-function (GOF) mutation in ABL1. Consistent with structural modeling, we demonstrate that mutations in ABL1 identified in primary NSCLC tumors and a lung cancer cell line increase downstream pathway activation compared to wild-type ABL1. Finally, we observe that the ABL1 cancer mutants display an increased cytosolic localization, which is associated with the oncogenic properties of the ABL1 kinase. In summary, our results suggest that NSCLC patients with ABL1 mutations could be stratified for treatment with imatinib in combination with other therapies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 33%
Student > Master 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Professor 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 8 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 60. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#249,547
of 12,579,850 outputs
Outputs from EMBO Molecular Medicine
#64
of 878 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,781
of 353,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EMBO Molecular Medicine
#4
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,579,850 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 878 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,931 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.