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Behavioural and electrophysiological effects of visual paired associate context manipulations during encoding and recognition in younger adults, older adults and older cognitively declined adults

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, December 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Behavioural and electrophysiological effects of visual paired associate context manipulations during encoding and recognition in younger adults, older adults and older cognitively declined adults
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, December 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00221-011-2966-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael J. Hogan, Joanne P. M. Kenney, Richard A. P. Roche, Michael A. Keane, Jennifer L. Moore, Jochen Kaiser, Robert Lai, Neil Upton

Abstract

The current study examined the EEG of young, old and old declined adults performing a visual paired associate task. In order to examine the effects of encoding context and stimulus repetition, target pairs were presented on either detailed or white backgrounds and were repeatedly presented during both early and late phases of encoding. Results indicated an increase in P300 amplitude in the right parietal cortex from early to late stages of encoding in older declined adults, whereas both younger adults and older controls showed a reduction in P300 amplitude in this same area from early to late phase encoding. In the right hemisphere, stimuli encoded with a white background had larger P300 amplitudes than stimuli presented with a detailed background; however, in the left hemisphere, in the later stages of encoding, stimuli presented with a detailed background had larger amplitudes than stimuli presented with a white background. Behaviourally, there was better memory for congruent stimuli reinstated with a detailed background, but this finding was for older controls only. During recognition, there was a general trend for congruent stimuli to elicit a larger amplitude response than incongruent stimuli, suggesting a distinct effect of context reinstatement on underlying patterns of physiological responding. However, behavioural data suggest that older declined adults showed no memory benefits associated with context reinstatement. When compared with older declined adults, younger adults had larger P100 amplitude responses to stimuli presented during recognition, and overall, younger adults had faster recognition reaction times than older control and older declined adults. Further analysis of repetition effects and context-based hemispheric asymmetry may prove informative in identifying declining memory performance in the elderly, potentially before it becomes manifested behaviourally.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 44 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Lecturer 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 11 23%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 51%
Neuroscience 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,445,879
of 13,941,062 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,078
of 2,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,783
of 210,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#6
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,941,062 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,353 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,843 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.