↓ Skip to main content

Tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease: linking the epidemics

Overview of attention for article published in Tropical Diseases, Travel Medicine and Vaccines, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease: linking the epidemics
Published in
Tropical Diseases, Travel Medicine and Vaccines, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40794-015-0014-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Moises A. Huaman, David Henson, Eduardo Ticona, Timothy R. Sterling, Beth A. Garvy

Abstract

The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Turkey 1 2%
Unknown 56 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 22%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Postgraduate 7 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 47%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,921,689
of 14,720,233 outputs
Outputs from Tropical Diseases, Travel Medicine and Vaccines
#52
of 76 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,983
of 364,948 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tropical Diseases, Travel Medicine and Vaccines
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,720,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,948 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.